RCA and Cinch are the same thing: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RCA_connector
"Cinch" is common e.g. in Europe, whereas "RCA" – quite obviously – in the U.S.
According to http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinch the correct term is apparently "RCA jack".

Thanks loukash!

I had http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/P-306-CCT-L/CJ206P-ND/82145 when I was thinking of Cinch. I wasn't aware that RCAs were being called that as well. possibly a euro thing by the looks of things.

A lot of these plugs have different names depending on region, it is kinda annoying!

I named it "RCA (Phono)" to cover what I thought were all bases. Same with other connectors like "1/4" Phone Jack (6.35mm)" - in the UK, that is a 'jack', in the USA it is a 'phone'... so I tried to add as many terms in as compact a way as possible to cover them all.

I can remove or rename Cinch (meaning the multi pronged plug I was intending it to be), that isn't a problem, it is not that common a connector. I'm not sure what to call it though!

From http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinch I have learned that "Cinch" is in fact also a US manufacturer. I didn't even knew.

Never heard of http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/P-306-CCT-L/CJ206P-ND/82145 either. So many unique connectors out there…

Yeh it is gonna be a challenge catching all the edge cases, this is only the first.

So, for folks from Germany / Europe - do you guys only know the RCA connector as a 'Cinch', or do you mostly know that is also called an RCA?

I am trying to figure out if I need to update that to "RCA (Phono) (Cinch)" or some-such.

Aaagggh!

do you guys only know the RCA connector as a 'Cinch'
Well… http://cs.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinch

update that to "RCA (Phono) (Cinch)" or some-such
Yes, something like that. (Although two pairs of parentheses) (look a bit clunky… ;)

^^ Forum bug: a quoted quotation mark ( " ) breaks a quote!

Thanks, I have updated the name to "RCA (Phono, Cinch)". As it stands, I have left the older version in the list. We'll need to go through all the present entries, and update the info to use the new entry. Once that is done, I can remove the old entry. Anyone is welcome to start this process, in any case, I will do it within the next 24 hours.

Ok, I have edited all the entries to update them as above, and have updated the list to remove "RCA (Phono)". Please use "RCA (Phono, Cinch)" now for this connector.

A third name for RCA/cinch-connectors is tulip or tulip-connector. I don't know how common that is, I think it's especially used by the Dutch. I'm not sure I'm correct in translating this into English, as I don't know if the name is actually used in English.

For the phone jacks: one should/could specify wether it's a TRS or a TS (Tip-Ring-Sleeve: mostly used for eiter a balanced mono signal, or an unbalanced stereo signal. TS is Tip-Sleeve: used for unbalanced mono signals)
A TRS has three parts (two insulation-rings), a TS two parts (one insulation ring)
A TRRS also exists (the "AV-cable" of your older videocam has a 1/8" TRRS-Jack on one side) with 4 parts/3 insulation rings

Apart from the connector, one can specify the type of signal that is (supposed to be) running through the connectors&veins
An options is an extra (optional) field to describe the type of signal. A (head)phone signal is different from a line signal or a phono signal:

Name: Headphone output - 1/4" TRS Jack (6.35mm) - Phone signal - Stereo, Socket (Female), unbalanced
Name: Phono input - RCA (Cinch) - Phono signal - Stereo, Socket (Female), unbalanced
Name: CD input - RCA (Cinch) - Line signal (consumer) - Stereo, Socket (Female), unbalanced
Name: Mic input - 1/4" TRS Jack (6.35mm) - Mic signal - Mono, Socket (Female), balanced
Name: Mic input - 1/4" TS Jack - Mic signal - Mono, Socket (Female), unbalanced
Name: Line input - 1/4" TRS Jack - Line signal (pro) - Mono, Socket, balanced
Name: Aux output - 1/4" TS Jack - Line Signal (pro) - Mono, Socket, unbalanced

To make things easy: a professional line signal is stronger than a consumer line signal (=± double voltage) And there is also an inbetween. Some pro-equipment has a 3-way switch for this: -10dB, 0dB & +4dB to adjust the input gain according to the line signal standard used.

ah... just look here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Line_level

The more specific descriptions will help a lot when trying to enter large, analog, pro mixing devices, for instance. Although mono+TRS implies a balanced signal (and so on), it's never bad to clearly specify all these things. (or at least: be able to do it)

Wiki seems to recognise the "phono connector", I'd avoid using this name in a professional environment, but I can understand that in common-speaking-terms these terms grew to represent the RCA/Cinch-connector as it is the most common connector used for the phono signal of a turntable.

(I've written technical desriptions of wanted audio & video gear the company wanted to buy, for about 8 years in a not too far past, unfortunatly for gearogs, I switched jobs. I had access to lotttttss of gear those days)

What do we call the bare screw connectors found on vintage equipment?

P.S. Digikey is awesome.

Hi folks!

A third name for RCA/cinch-connectors is tulip or tulip-connector. I don't know how common that is, I think it's especially used by the Dutch. I'm not sure I'm correct in translating this into English, as I don't know if the name is actually used in English.

What is the Dutch name? It doesn't surprise me that this is used. I wonder though how far we go down the colloquialism path on these names?

For the phone jacks: one should/could specify wether it's a TRS or a TS (Tip-Ring-Sleeve: mostly used for eiter a balanced mono signal, or an unbalanced stereo signal. TS is Tip-Sleeve: used for unbalanced mono signals)
A TRS has three parts (two insulation-rings), a TS two parts (one insulation ring)
A TRRS also exists (the "AV-cable" of your older videocam has a 1/8" TRRS-Jack on one side) with 4 parts/3 insulation rings

You can do that in the 'Description' field, as 'Mono', 'Stereo', 'Balanced', and 'Unbalanced'. TRRS would be '4 Way'.

An options is an extra (optional) field to describe the type of signal. A (head)phone signal is different from a line signal or a phono signal

The name of the connection should give a clue, for example, 'Headphone Out', 'Line In' etc.

Name: Headphone output - 1/4" TRS Jack (6.35mm) - Phone signal - Stereo, Socket (Female), unbalanced

This can already be entered, maybe I am misunderstanding what you are looking for?

The more specific descriptions will help a lot when trying to enter large, analog, pro mixing devices, for instance.

Notes can be used for mentioning the levels the equipment operates at.

Although mono+TRS implies a balanced signal (and so on), it's never bad to clearly specify all these things. (or at least: be able to do it)

It is already possible to do this on the form.

Wiki seems to recognise the "phono connector", I'd avoid using this name in a professional environment, but I can understand that in common-speaking-terms these terms grew to represent the RCA/Cinch-connector as it is the most common connector used for the phono signal of a turntable.

A lot of these terms are different from country to country, unfortunately. If you said "RCA" in the UK, no one would know what you were talking about, unfortunately!

What do we call the bare screw connectors found on vintage equipment?

'Binding Post'

[quote]What is the Dutch name?[/quote]
In Dutch they say Tulp-stekker. In the Dutch speaking part of Belgium cinch is still the most common name.
I don't think it should be included here, unless lots of submitters use this name. But it's nice to know!

[quote]You can do that in the 'Description' field, as 'Mono', 'Stereo', 'Balanced', and 'Unbalanced'. TRRS would be '4 Way'. [/quote]
Ah yes, 2 way TS, 3 way TRS, 4 way TRRS, I agree this is the best (just works the same as XLR/DIN/etc)
But mono/stereo balanced/unbalanced isn't the same as TS/TRS, although one can guess wether it's a TS or TRS

why is there no 44way to choose? (My Delta has a 44 pin D-Sub cable breakout)
There is also a 23 pin Dsub on an Amiga (for the screen). I guess Amiga's/C64/128's (etc.) are considered gear as well? As they contain music-dedicated hardware and are (uh... sorry, were) very good sequencers with the right software.

[quote]This can already be entered, maybe I am misunderstanding what you are looking for? [/quote]
The signal (headphone) is added, but you answered that part too. tnx
[quote]The name of the connection should give a clue, for example, 'Headphone Out', 'Line In' etc. [/quote]
Yes, it gives a clue, but it might be nice if the clue could optionally be specified.
Athough: one can specify this in the Specs-section too (or notes)

[quote]If you said "RCA" in the UK, no one would know what you were talking about, unfortunately! [/quote]
I guess here in Belgium lots of people will not understand RCA either

(looks like I forgot the right forum codes in my post...)

why is there no 44way to choose? (My Delta has a 44 pin D-Sub cable breakout) There is also a 23 pin Dsub

I have added 44 and 23 way, thanks!

Here in USA, the RCA cable connectors are also referred to as composite cables, usually when a (yellow) video connection is included. This was a more recent development, late 1980s or so.

Well, that is kinda recent for some of us old guys who can remember cranking up their record player. Lol

The term 'Composite' doesn't refer to the cable or connector, but to the video signal that went through the yellow RCA connector.

The full signal is an RGB signal (three channels + 2 sync signals), a bit more reduced, but still almost uncompressed is the component signal: A channel for the black/whites+sync, and two color channels from which the third color channel can be generated. A more reduced signal was the s-video with two cables: the black/white+sync + the color signals from the component signal, but modulated into one signal. The most compressed analog video signal was the composite signal: all signals modulated into one single signal. Mainly the black/white channel, but at a certain frequency the color information was modulated into the signal. When fine black/white patterns where in the image, these distorted the color signals which created calor artifacts in the patterns. (Because of that, tv programs such as the new most often will avoid clothes with too many patterns)

A composite cable is normally an RCA connector (yellow) for low end consumer electronics or a BNC connector in higher end & professional video equipment. the S-video signal most often came through a 4-pin mini-DIN connector. Component is very well known in later consumer equipment (DVD players etc.) with the YPbPr connections, but i earlier equipment only was available in high end equipment as BNC connectors.
RGB mostly comes as five BNC connectors. the SCART-connector can have composite, s-video and RGB/Component signals (but not all are effectively used in all equipment.) the VGA Dsub also sends Component/RGB signals.

Technically a composite cable should be a coax cable, but some cinch-composite cables are just two cables just as an audio cable, giving more artifacts & noise, especially at long lengths.

Dr. Sultan knows his stuff! (listen to that guy).

And ya, Cinch is the name of a big cable/connector manufacturer -- along the lines of other companies like Cannon (creator of XLR and D-subs), Amphenol, Conec, Teledyne Reynolds, Assmann Electronics, Norcomp, Positronic, 3M, and Tyco -- and they probably were the predominant manufacturer of RCA connectors (commonly called phono or A/V connectors/jacks) throughout Europe, so they became known as "Cinch connectors" instead of by their American origin, RCA.

"loukash" 2014 « According to http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinch the correct term is apparently "RCA jack" »
Popular usage too often strays away from the correct meanings of the words, which are AFAIK (thanks in advance to anyone for eventual useful corrections):

Female = Socket or Jack (EN), Prise (FR), Steckdose (DE)
Male = Plug (EN), Fiche (FR), Stecker (DE)
Neutral = Connector (EN), Connecteur (FR), Verbinder (DE)

The german wikipedia page referenced only contains "RCA Jack" in its link to a Datasheet for a particular item, which BTW recalls that female or male is sometimes unclear, particularly for RCA connectors where the shielding may make the male connector look as female, as seems the case in the said item.
Versailles, Thu 18 Jan 2018 11:44:10 +0100

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