E-mu

Unofficially founded in 1970 by Scott Wedge and Dave Rossum, E-mu began making modular synthesizers. In 1972, E-mu officially became a company, developing and patenting a digitally scanned polyphonic keyboard (1973), licensed for use by Oberheim Electronics in the 4-Voice and 8-Voice synthesizers and by Dave Smith in the Sequential Circuits Prophet-5. E-mu, along with Solid State Microtechnologies, also developed several synthesizer module IC chips, that were used by both E-mu and many other synthesizer companies.

Comments

meatsock posted 4 years ago:

1973 - E-mu Modular System
1980 - Audity
1981 - Emulator
1983 - Drumulator
1984 - Emulator II
1985 - E-mu SP-12 Drum Sampler
1986 - Emax
1987 - Emulator III
1987 - E-mu SP-1200 Drum Sampler
1989 - Proteus 1
1993 - Morpheus
1994 - Emulator IV / e 64
1996 - Orbit 9090 V2
1997 - Planet Phat
1998 - Proteus 2000
1998 - E-mu APS (Audio Production Studio)
1999 - E4 Ultra Samplers
2001- XL7/MP7 Command Stations
2003 - PCI Digital Audio Systems
2004 - Emulator X
2005 - CardBus Digital Audio Systems
2006 - Emulator X2
2006 - E-mu Xboard 25, 49, 61
2006 - E-mu Proteus X
2007 - Digital Sound Factory licenses and remasters original Proteus and Emulator sound libraries
2009 - E-mu PIPEline Digital Wireless Transmitter and Receiver System
2009 - Emulator X3, the final incarnation of E-MU's flagship software sampler
2010 - E-mu longboard 61, shortboard 49 wireless performance keyboards

nik replied 4 years ago:

Where did you dig up this list meatsock?

One that got away - http://www.gearogs.com/gear/9796-E-mu-RM45 :-)

meatsock replied 4 years ago:
nik replied 4 years ago:

Cool, thanks!

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